Ben Lomond

 

A friend and I managed a walk up Ben Lomond a couple of weekends ago, one of the more popular peaks in the Scottish Highlands. We were not short of fellow travellers, with the mountain being quite busy.

I managed a couple of nice shots on the way up and on the way back down, but sadly the top was just cloud! Ah well, an excuse to do it again in better weather (although I’m not sure there is such a thing as ‘better weather’ in the Scottish highlands…) This shot was my favourite from the day, I think it captures the drama of being up there in the clouds pretty well.

Slow Worm 

This is a Slow Worm – which is neither a snake or a worm… 

It’s actually a type of legless lizard common to the British Isles. A friend and I found this little fella – it is apparently a male by its markings – on the way back down Ben Lomond a couple of Sundays ago. We originally thought we’d found an Adder, but some Googling put us right. 

He’s a wee cracker, and was quite happy to pose for some pictures before slithering away under a rock (not that slowly, either).

Thanks for visiting 🙂 

K

Ben Arthur & Arthur’s Seat

Arthurs Seat Cobbler W

The weekend before last a friend and I climbed The Cobbler in the Western Scottish Highlands – believe it or not, this stunning view from the highest point on The cobbler – Ben Arthur and Arthur’s Seat – is only an hour and ten minute journey from Glasgow by train to Arrochar and Tarbet station (plus a few hours climb uphill).

The prominent rock in the picture is Arthur’s Seat, not to be confused with the peak of the same name in Holyrood Park, Edinburgh. Many places in the UK are named after the Mythical King Arthur, whose existence is the subject of debate, as most of the information we have about Arthur comes from folklore.

The loch on the right of the picture is Loch Long, a sea loch which filters out into the Firth of Clyde, south past the Ayrshire Bay and out into the Irish Sea or the Atlantic Ocean, depending on which direction it travels.

More photos from this trip to come!

As always, thanks for visiting 🙂

Double Exposure Part 2

A couple of weeks ago I posted a double exposure shot of some rhodedendron in Rosshall Park, and wanted to share another double exposure shot today.
This one is a bit different – definite ‘goth’ vibe about it I think… My 14 year old mosher self would have loved this, I’m sure.

I put this image together from a shot of the front door in the disused cottage that sits next to one of the gates into Rosshall, overlayed with some bluebells that I came across while wandering about.

Sadly, the soup I tried to make from some wild garlic I picked in the park that day didn’t turn out so well!

Thanks for visiting!

K 🙂

Double Exposure (pt1)

Rhodedendron / Lilley Pond, Rosshall Park, Glasgow.

The Snapseed app, which is a fantastic photo editing app for smart phones, has a new double exposure feature that I thought I’d have a play about with – and was very impressed with the results!

I combined two photos I took in Rosshall Park, Glasgow (a beautiful Park – if you live in Glasgow but haven’t been I reccomended checking it out). The background is of the lilley pond in the park, and I overlayed an image of a rhododendron taken on the same day. I think it looks pretty cool! What do you think?

Thanks for visiting,

K 🙂

Clydeside Sunset 

Oh how I do love the Clyde on a sunny evening in May. Really enjoying the new River walkway the council have built – you can now stroll along the river all the way from the gravings docks to the BAE Shipyard, and it’s lovely 🙂 

Thanks for reading! 

Govan Graving Docks

Govan Graving Docks, Glasgow UK

(click image for more detailed version)

This is one of my quiet places, a big space to wander about in with little chance of bumping into other people. A space to wander in alone with my thoughts. The site is totally unique in Scotland, and a reminder of Govan, and Glasgow’s, shipbuilding heritage. The term ‘graving’ refers to the process of coating the bottom of boats with pitch to prepare them for long sea journeys, and this was the main purpose of the docks as well as ship repairs.

Sadly there are plans to turn the space into flats, probably flats that nobody in Govan can afford (queue the gentrification of Govan?). Developments on the site were originally touted to be around the idea of promoting the heritage of the site and perhaps building a museum or something similar that the community could access and enjoy, but as always it comes down to money and so they’ll wreck this historically significant site to build some bland luxury apartments so the middle classes can enjoy a shorter commute to their tax-avoiding city jobs.

I’ll be enjoying the space as much as I can until then.

Thanks for visiting and taking the time to read 🙂

#WeBuiltShips

Govan gravings docks looking east along the Clyde towards the SECC and Science Centre tower.

Hello everyone, bit of a gap between now and my last post, so apologies are due! I’ve been very busy, not just with the festive period but also with a new job and a new flat – top tip: don’t move house over Christmas and New Year, it’s very difficult and you will literally burst with stress.

One of my New Year’s resolutions (do people still do these, aye?) is to post more photographs on my blogs. However, this has been hampered a bit by the fact that I have no Internet in the new flat yet, and it otherwise seems to be a communications blackspot, with no mobile signal whatsoever.

Part of the old Fairfield Yard (the abandoned part, as far as I can tell)

Anyway, despite the lack of Internet I’ve ended up starting a mini photo project recently, and completely by accident, too. As mentioned, I recently moved to Govan, an area of Glasgow famous for its shipbuilding past. There are still a few yards left in Govan, most notably Fairfield Heritage, and BAE Systems, where recent orders for the Royal Navy are still being fulfilled and ships are therefore very much still being built (incidentally, BAE Systems and Fairfield Heritage shipyards are my neighbours and, I suspect, the main reason I can’t get any mobile phone signal in my flat). However, the amount of shipbuilding happening in Govan these days is a shadow of the former industry in the area.
I’ve been taking lots of photos, as I do, and have found myself using the hashtag #WeBuiltShips on a lot of my Instagram posts. From this a definite theme has emerged (or, is emerging at least) around the transformation of Govan from shipyards to what it is now – an area which is still changing and evolving out of the industrial era into the new age, so to speak. As always, the changing urban environment is really interesting to me, and so I’ve found myself documenting various aspects of the Govan architecture and urban landscape. And what a rich history Govan has!

The entrance to Fairfield Yard – one of my new neighbours!

These are a few of the shots I’ve gotten recently with my Sony Xperia phone – I’m finding more and more these days that there’s less and less difference between my phone and my DSLR, for daylight shooting anyway. Im currently considering a new camera, but I’d love to know people’s opinions on me posting camera phone Vs DSLR pics. Is there a noticeable difference, do you consider camera phone pics to be cheating or lazy, do you even care?!
Hopefully the #WeBuiltShips theme is something I can keep going with, and maybe even turn into a proper project. Stay tuned for updates, and as always, thanks for visiting 🙂

Glasgow Dental Hospital

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Via Wikipedia:

The Glasgow Dental Hospital and School is a dental teaching hospital, situated in the Garnethill area of the city centre of Glasgow, Scotland. Dental students have been educated in Glasgow since 1879, and the Dental School began issuing the Bachelor of Dental Surgery Degree of the University of Glasgow in 1948. The current hospital is based in a 1931 Art Deco building on Renfrew Street. Designed by Wylie, Wright, and Wylie, is protected as a category B listed building. There is also a larger extension fronting Sauchiehall Street built in the brutalist style by Melville Dundas & Whitson in 1970. The West of Scotland Postgraduate Dental Centre is located adjacent to the Dental School and provides post-graduate and distance dental education.