Autumn Climb up Goatfell

(click on images for full screen version)

On Sunday some friends and I decided to make the best of a beautiful clear (if cold!) November day and get one final climb in before the end of the year. We took an early ferry over to Arran from Glasgow, conscious of the fact sundown was around 4pm, for a quick climb up Goatfell – the second time I’ve climbed this mountain this year. I couldn’t share too many pictures from last time as I was there with work, so I’m glad to be able to share more of this trip. The weather was also much better this time round, despite the last trip being in July!

We took a walk along the fisherman’s walk and up the ‘tourist path’ to ascend Goatfell. This time of year is perfect for climbing if you can get a nice clear, cold day like we did. The colours in the forest on the first part of the ascent were an amazing mix of greens, browns, reds and gold. There was the added bonus of a bit of snow cover on the top of the mountain and the last part of the ascent, making the climb more difficult (think vertical scrambling on rocks with snow and occasional black ice…), but adding to the overall beauty of the scenery. This time of year is excellent for photographing Scottish mountains; you truly get the best of both worlds in terms of capturing the end of autumn and the beginning of winter.

The visibility and light were brilliant, and the views across Brodick Bay were excellent, with Ailsa Craig, the extinct volcano referred to as the ‘jewel of the Firth of Clyde’ is just visible in the distance to the south. the peak to the right is the Holy Isle, which is inhabited by Buddhist monks where you can go for spiritual retreats and meditation.

Despite the cold we made it to the top and back in 4 hours – including a slight detour along the wrong ridge on our descent (the ridge visible in the third photo above), before we realised our mistake and had to walk horizontally along the south-east face of the mountain, which was a bit scary in the snow with no path! The wind was so strong at the summit that we rushed to get back down out the gale, which is why we initially took the wrong ridge. Lesson learned; even in excellent visibility, and on a reasonably easy corbett, it’s easy to lose your bearings when your’re hundreds of metres above sea level in even slightly challenging weather. I know this mountain well, so noticed our mistake fairly quickly, but had we not noticed and continued down the western side of the mountain we could have been in serious trouble given the sun was setting and the temperature dropping quickly.

The view from the top was stunning as always, revealing the rest of Arran’s  mountain ranges several of which were snow-peaked. Well worth the climb despite the cold! The trip was topped off by the amazing view of the stars on the ferry back to Ardrossan on the mainland; the silver lining to it being dark before 5pm in Scotland at this time of year. It was a bit choppy, so no pictures unfortunately!

As always, I hope you enjoyed the pictures and thanks for visiting!

K

Riverside Museum & Tall Ship After Sunset

Hello lovely people! The dark nights are well and truly here, as is winter going by the temperature last night.

This is the Riverside Museum (aka the new Transport Museum) and the ‘Tall Ship’ – the permanent view across the Clyde from Govan town centre, luckily for us Govanites.

Chilly hands while I was down the Clyde taking this, not long after sunset (it was about 5pm when I took this, despite looking like midnight). I’m proper chuffed, because I didn’t have my tripod with me and managed to improvise using the corner of a railing to get this shot nice and sharp.

I’d been wanting to get down and take a picture of the museum at night for a while, that green light kinda draws you in…

As always, thanks for visiting and I hope you enjoy the pics 🙂

Ben Lomond

 

A friend and I managed a walk up Ben Lomond a couple of weekends ago, one of the more popular peaks in the Scottish Highlands. We were not short of fellow travellers, with the mountain being quite busy.

I managed a couple of nice shots on the way up and on the way back down, but sadly the top was just cloud! Ah well, an excuse to do it again in better weather (although I’m not sure there is such a thing as ‘better weather’ in the Scottish highlands…) This shot was my favourite from the day, I think it captures the drama of being up there in the clouds pretty well.

Slow Worm 

This is a Slow Worm – which is neither a snake or a worm… 

It’s actually a type of legless lizard common to the British Isles. A friend and I found this little fella – it is apparently a male by its markings – on the way back down Ben Lomond a couple of Sundays ago. We originally thought we’d found an Adder, but some Googling put us right. 

He’s a wee cracker, and was quite happy to pose for some pictures before slithering away under a rock (not that slowly, either).

Thanks for visiting 🙂 

K

Ben Arthur & Arthur’s Seat

Arthurs Seat Cobbler W

The weekend before last a friend and I climbed The Cobbler in the Western Scottish Highlands – believe it or not, this stunning view from the highest point on The cobbler – Ben Arthur and Arthur’s Seat – is only an hour and ten minute journey from Glasgow by train to Arrochar and Tarbet station (plus a few hours climb uphill).

The prominent rock in the picture is Arthur’s Seat, not to be confused with the peak of the same name in Holyrood Park, Edinburgh. Many places in the UK are named after the Mythical King Arthur, whose existence is the subject of debate, as most of the information we have about Arthur comes from folklore.

The loch on the right of the picture is Loch Long, a sea loch which filters out into the Firth of Clyde, south past the Ayrshire Bay and out into the Irish Sea or the Atlantic Ocean, depending on which direction it travels.

More photos from this trip to come!

As always, thanks for visiting 🙂

Double Exposure Part 2

A couple of weeks ago I posted a double exposure shot of some rhodedendron in Rosshall Park, and wanted to share another double exposure shot today.
This one is a bit different – definite ‘goth’ vibe about it I think… My 14 year old mosher self would have loved this, I’m sure.

I put this image together from a shot of the front door in the disused cottage that sits next to one of the gates into Rosshall, overlayed with some bluebells that I came across while wandering about.

Sadly, the soup I tried to make from some wild garlic I picked in the park that day didn’t turn out so well!

Thanks for visiting!

K 🙂

Double Exposure (pt1)

Rhodedendron / Lilley Pond, Rosshall Park, Glasgow.

The Snapseed app, which is a fantastic photo editing app for smart phones, has a new double exposure feature that I thought I’d have a play about with – and was very impressed with the results!

I combined two photos I took in Rosshall Park, Glasgow (a beautiful Park – if you live in Glasgow but haven’t been I reccomended checking it out). The background is of the lilley pond in the park, and I overlayed an image of a rhododendron taken on the same day. I think it looks pretty cool! What do you think?

Thanks for visiting,

K 🙂

Clydeside Sunset 

Oh how I do love the Clyde on a sunny evening in May. Really enjoying the new River walkway the council have built – you can now stroll along the river all the way from the gravings docks to the BAE Shipyard, and it’s lovely 🙂 

Thanks for reading! 

Govan Graving Docks

Govan Graving Docks, Glasgow UK

(click image for more detailed version)

This is one of my quiet places, a big space to wander about in with little chance of bumping into other people. A space to wander in alone with my thoughts. The site is totally unique in Scotland, and a reminder of Govan, and Glasgow’s, shipbuilding heritage. The term ‘graving’ refers to the process of coating the bottom of boats with pitch to prepare them for long sea journeys, and this was the main purpose of the docks as well as ship repairs.

Sadly there are plans to turn the space into flats, probably flats that nobody in Govan can afford (queue the gentrification of Govan?). Developments on the site were originally touted to be around the idea of promoting the heritage of the site and perhaps building a museum or something similar that the community could access and enjoy, but as always it comes down to money and so they’ll wreck this historically significant site to build some bland luxury apartments so the middle classes can enjoy a shorter commute to their tax-avoiding city jobs.

I’ll be enjoying the space as much as I can until then.

Thanks for visiting and taking the time to read 🙂